Green Your Bottom Line in Food and Beverage Businesses


Companies that manufacture or process food and beverages are increasingly important to the economy of Massachusetts. While size, market, and product type vary, they all use and pay for energy, water, chemicals (cleaning products or others), and waste management. They also share an interest in reducing and/or avoiding costs so they can sustain and expand business while ensuring their products are safe for consumption. This sector has untapped opportunities to prevent pollution by increasing energy efficiency, renewable energy use, water efficiency, and reducing waste and the use of toxics.

Green Your Bottom Line in Food and Beverage Businesses is an initiative to support food and beverage businesses in making pollution prevention improvements to their facilities and processes, which will benefit both their businesses and the environment:
We are holding a series of interactive workshops for food and beverage businesses to share experiences, challenges and successes to date and plan future actions. Workshops will include case studies and lessons learned, technical topics, and opportunities to learn from peers. Our team of experts will connect participants with the appropriate resources - many of them free - and incentives or funding to help with energy and environmental improvements. We have held four workshops across Massachusetts between May 2016 and May 2017, and participants gave very positive feedback, citing the networking opportunities and connection with resources as particularly helpful.

For more information, email us or follow us @foodbeverageMA on twitter.

We are currently planning our next workshops. Check back or email us for more information, or let us know if your food/beverage business might be interested in hosting a workshop.





Examples of food and beverage businesses that are greening their bottom line:
The initiative is a joint effort of the University of Massachusetts and several government agencies:

                                                                                                                                                  
This work is supported by a grant (00A00329) from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-Region 1 New England for Pollution Prevention in the Food and Beverage Processing Sector.